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CIA Library Displays: Vote : Fall 2020 virtual display


CIA Gund Library Fall 2020 virtual display

Find ebooks, streaming videos, and more about the history of U.S. voting rights and the election process.


 

Scroll through and click on the book cover or title below to view a full text ebook from the CIA Library catalog.

Ballot Blocked

Voting rights are a perennial topic in American politics. Recent elections and the Supreme Court's decision in Shelby County v. Holder, which struck down key enforcement provisions in the Voting Rights Act (VRA), have only placed further emphasis on the debate over voter disenfranchaisement. Over the past five decades, both Democrats and Republicans in Congress have consistently voted to expand the protections offered to vulnerable voters by the Voting Rights Act. And yet, the administration of the VRA has become more fragmented and judicial interpretation of its terms has become much less generous. Why have Republicans consistently adopted administrative and judicial decisions that undermine legislation they repeatedly endorse? Ballot Blocked shows how the divergent trajectories of legislation, administration, and judicial interpretation in voting rights policymaking derive largely from efforts by conservative politicians to narrow the scope of federal enforcement while at the same time preserving their public reputations as supporters of racial equality and minority voting rights. Jesse H. Rhodes argues that conservatives adopt a paradoxical strategy in which they acquiesce to expansive voting rights protections in Congress (where decisions are visible and easily traceable) while simultaneously narrowing the scope of federal enforcement via administrative and judicial maneuvers (which are less visible and harder to trace). Over time, the repeated execution of this strategy has enabled a conservative Supreme Court to exercise preponderant influence over the scope of federal enforcement.

This Bright Light of Ours

This Bright Light of Ours offers a tightly focused insider's view of the community-based activism that was the heart of the civil rights movement. A celebration of grassroots heroes, this book details through first-person accounts the contributions of ordinary people who formed  the nonviolent army that won the fight for voting rights. Combining memoir and oral history, Maria Gitin fills a vital gap in civil rights history by focusing on the neglected Freedom Summer of 1965 when hundreds of college students joined forces with local black leaders to register thousands of new black voters in the rural South. Gitin was an idealistic nineteen-year-old college freshman from a small farming community north of San Francisco who felt called to action when she saw televised images of brutal attacks on peaceful demonstrators during Bloody Sunday, in Selma, Alabama. Atypical among white civil rights volunteers, Gitin came from a rural low-income family. She raised funds to attend an intensive orientation in Atlanta featuring now-legendary civil rights leaders. Her detailed letters include the first narrative account of this orientation and the only in-depth field report from a teenage Summer Community Organization and Political Education (SCOPE) project participant. Gitin details the dangerous life of civil rights activists in Wilcox County, Alabama, where she was assigned. She tells of threats and arrests, but also of forming deep friendships and of falling in love. More than four decades later, Gitin returned to Wilcox County to revisit the people and places that she could never forget and to discover their views of the "outside agitators" who had come to their community. Through conversational interviews with more than fifty Wilcox County residents and former civil rights workers, she has created a channel for the voices of these unheralded heroes who formed the backbone of the civil rights movement.

Native Vote

The right to vote is the foundation of democratic government; all other policies are derived from it. The history of voting rights in America has been characterized by a gradual expansion of the franchise. American Indians are an important part of that story but have faced a prolonged battle to gain the franchise. One of the most important tools wielded by advocates of minority voting rights has been the Voting Rights Act. This book explains the history and expansion of Indian voting rights, with an emphasis on seventy cases based on the Voting Rights Act and/or the Equal Protection Clause. The authors describe the struggle to obtain Indian citizenship and the basic right to vote, then analyze the cases brought under the Voting Rights Act, including three case studies. The final two chapters assess the political impact of these cases and the role of American Indians in contemporary politics.

And yet They Persisted

A comprehensive history of the women's suffrage movement in the United States, from 1776 to 1965 Most suffrage histories begin in 1848, when Elizabeth Cady Stanton first publicly demanded the right to vote at the Women's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, New York. And they end in 1920, when Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify the 19th Amendment, removing sexual barriers to the vote. And Yet They Persisted traces agitation for the vote over two centuries, from the revolutionary era to the civil rights era, excavating one of the greatest struggles for social change in this country and restoring African American women and other women of color to its telling.  In this sweeping history, author Johanna Neuman demonstrates that American women defeated the male patriarchy only after they convinced men that it was in their interests to share political power. Reintegrating the long struggle for the women's suffrage into the metanarrative of U.S. history, Dr. Neuman sheds new light on such questions as: Why it took so long to achieve equal voting rights for women How victories in state suffrage campaigns pressured Congress to act Why African American women had to fight again for their rights in 1965 How the struggle by eight generations of female activists finally succeeded And Yet They Persisted: How American Women Won the Right to Vote his is the ideal text for college courses in women's studies and history covering the women's suffrage movement, as well as courses on American History, Political History, Progressive Era reforms, or reform movements in general. Click here to read Johanna Neuman's two-part blog post about the hidden history of Women's Suffrage as we celebrate the centennial anniversary of the 19th Amendment.

Public Freedom

The freedom to take part in civic life--whether in the exercise of one's right to vote or congregate and protest--has become increasingly less important to Americans than individual rights and liberties. In Public Freedom, renowned political theorist Dana Villa argues that political freedom is essential to both the preservation of constitutional government and the very substance of American democracy itself. Through intense close readings of theorists such as Hegel, Tocqueville, Mill, Adorno, Arendt, and Foucault, Villa diagnoses the key causes of our democratic discontent and offers solutions to preserve at least some of our democratic hopes. He demonstrates how Americans' preoccupation with a market-based conception of freedom--that is, the personal freedom to choose among different material, moral, and vocational goods--has led to the gradual erosion of meaningful public participation in politics as well as diminished interest in the health of the public realm itself. Villa critically examines, among other topics, the promise and limits of civil society and associational life as sources of democratic renewal; the effects of mass media on the public arena; and the problematic but still necessary ideas of civic competence and democratic maturity. Public Freedom is a passionate and insightful defense of political liberties at a moment in America's history when such freedoms are very much at risk.

The Right to Vote

The Right to Vote examines how voting rights have evolved throughout the history of the United States. This title looks at the reasons behind limiting the right to vote, the suffrage movements of various groups, and current debates surrounding voting issues in the country. Features include a glossary, references, websites, source notes, and an index. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Essential Library is an imprint of Abdo Publishing, a division of ABDO.

Right to Vote: the contested history of democracy in the United States

Most Americans take for granted their right to vote, whether they choose to exercise it or not. But the history of suffrage in the U.S. is, in fact,the story of a struggle to achieve this right by our society's marginalized groups. In The Right to Vote, Duke historian Alexander Keyssar explores the evolution of suffrage over the course of the nation's history. Examining the many features of the history of the right to vote in the U.S.--class, ethnicity, race, gender, religion, and age--the book explores the conditions under which American democracy has expanded and contracted over the years.Keyssar presents convincing evidence that the history of the right to vote has not been one of a steady history of expansion and increasing inclusion, noting that voting rights contracted substantially in the U.S. between 1850 and 1920. Keyssar also presents a controversial thesis: that the primary factor promoting the expansion of the suffrage has been war and the primary factors promoting contraction or delaying expansion have been class tension and class conflict.

Voting Rights of Refugees

Voting Rights of Refugees develops a novel legal argument about the voting rights of refugees recognised in the 1951 Geneva Convention. The main normative contention is that such refugees should have the right to vote in the political community where they reside, assuming that this community is a democracy and that its citizens have the right to vote. The book argues that recognised refugees are a special category of non-citizen residents: they are unable to participate in elections of their state of origin, do not enjoy its diplomatic protection and consular assistance abroad, and are unable or unwilling, owing to a well-founded fear of persecution, to return to it. Refugees deserve to have a place in the world, in the Arendtian sense, where their opinions are significant and their actions are effective. Their state of asylum is the only community in which there is any prospect of political participation on their part.

Behind the Ballot Box

Interest in voting systems and voting system reform is growing in the United States. Voting systems_the procedures by which we cast votes and elect our public officials_are a crucial part of the democratic election process. The decision to use one kind of voting system rather than another has far-reaching political consequences. Among other things, voting systems help to determine which officials are elected to run our governments, the variety of parties that voters have to choose from at the polls, whether political minorities can win any representation, and whether the majority will rule. Amy gives readers all the information and analytical tools needed to make intelligent choices among voting systems. He provides a set of political criteria that can be used to judge voting systems and gives detailed descriptions of all the common voting systems used in the United States and other Western democracies, including winner-take-all systems as well as proportional representation systems. He also provides an analysis of the various political advantages and disadvantages associated with each type of system. This is an important guide for citizens, government officials, political activists, students, and anyone who wants to learn more about voting systems and their political implications.

Electoral Integrity in America

Concern about the integrity of American elections did not start with Trump's election; flaws in procedures have gradually grown during recent decades. The contemporary "tipping point" that raised public awareness was the 2000 Bush v. Gore Florida count, but, the 2016 campaign and its aftermath clearly worsened several major structural weaknesses. This deepened party polarization over the rules of the game and corroded American trust in the electoral process. Disputes over elections have proliferated on all sides in Trump's America with heated debate about the key problems--whether the risks of electoral fraud, fake news, voter suppression, or Russian interference--and with no consensus about the right solutions. This book illuminates several major challenges observed during the 2016 U.S. elections, focusing upon concern about both the security and inclusiveness of the voter registration process in America. Given the importance of striking the right balance between security and inclusiveness in voter registration, this volume brings together legal scholars, political scientists, and electoral assistance practitioners to provide new evidence-based insights and policy-relevant recommendations.


Click on the video below to stream it directly or click on the source link to view.

 

Voting: a Right and a Responsibility

Source Link: Films on Demand

From Films on Demand: "Why should I vote? Does my vote count? This program addresses these questions and reinforces the importance of voting to the political process. The program begins with a history of voting, and the struggles of women and African-Americans to gain voting rights. It then offers examples of close elections. Students are encouraged to consider how history might have been changed if the outcomes had been different. Instructions on how to vote, how to register, absentee voting, and how to use a voting machine are presented. Both primary and general elections are discussed on the local, state, and national levels, as well as referendums and votes on constitutional amendments. Students learn how to critically evaluate candidates based on their positions, experience, and other factors. A Cambridge Educational Production.

TIP: Off campus? Search the video's title on our Quick Search page. Make sure to also click the link in the yellow bar at the top of the page and log in to access the proxy server. You can also view our Films on Demand guide to find out how to create a Films on Demand account.

"The American Promise"

Source Link: YouTube

On March 15, 1965, Lyndon B. Johnson's speech before Congress called for a passing of a bill that would expand and protect the voting rights of all American citizens, especially the voting rights of citizens of color. This speech came one week after "Bloody Sunday" in Selma, Alabama.

On August 4, 1965, the US Senate passed the Voting Rights Act of 1965. President Johnson signed it into law two days later.

You can view Johnson's March 15th speech above, titled "The American Promise."

By the People: Democracy in the Wild

Source Link: Films on Demand

From Films on Demand: "This film offers an unprecedented insider's look as events unfolded over the 11 days preceding the 2004 presidential election. By The People: Democracy In The Wild reveals who and what it takes to put on an American election. This behind-the-scenes documentary follows average Americans as they race to get the polls open on Election Day. After witnessing their struggle to uphold the most basic aspect of democracy, viewers will never again take the right to vote for granted."

TIP: Off campus? Search the video's title on Quick Search page. Make sure to click the link in the yellow bar at the top of the page and log in to access the proxy server. You can also view our Films on Demand guide to find out how to create a Films on Demand account.

Stop by the library to check out these books from the stacks!

 


 

Are you from Ohio or want to register in Ohio?

Visit the Ohio Secretary of State's Voter page to:

  • Register to vote

  • Check eligibility and residency requirements

  • Change your address

  • Check your voter registration

  • Learn about the options you have for voting

  • And lots, lots more! 


 

Not from Ohio?Vote image

Find your state's information in the state by state guide here at the Campus Vote Project's website.


Inform your vote!

Check out these resources to learn how to educate yourself on the ballot you give your vote to.

Vote411.org

From website: "Launched by the League of Women Voters Education Fund (LWVEF) in October of 2006, VOTE411.org is a "one-stop-shop" for election related information. It provides nonpartisan information to the public with both general and state-specific information on the following aspects of the election process":

  • Absentee ballot information
  • Ballot measure information (where applicable)
  • Early voting options (where applicable)
  • Election dates
  • Factual data on candidates in various federal, state and local races
  • General information on such topics as how to watch debates with a critical eye
  • ID requirements
  • Polling place locations
  • Registration deadlines
  • Voter qualifications
  • Voter registration forms
  • Voting machines

Ballotready.org

From website: "BallotReady is on a mission to make democracy work the way it should by helping voters across the U.S. exercise their right to vote and vote informed on every race and measure on their ballot. BallotReady provides personalized, nonpartisan information to voters in all 50 states. In addition, BallotReady helps voters make a plan to vote safely, through early voting and vote-by-mail, based on the process in every jurisdiction. BallotReady helps impassioned voters scale their impact and get out the vote with tools for SuperVoters and BallotParties."

Ballotpedia.org

From website: "Ballotpedia is the digital encyclopedia of American politics and elections. Our goal is to inform people about politics by providing accurate and objective information about politics at all levels of government. We are firmly committed to neutrality in our content; here's why."

 

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